News about Innovation in the Built Environment

StartUps

Your building is talking. Are you listening?

Your building is talking. Eric Hall asks, “Are you listening?”

Eric is Founder and Chief Innovation Officer at Site 1001, a smart building performance and operations platform that uses the Internet of Things and data from various sensors as well as the building’s original information (like construction documents) to solve simple and complex problems with potentially expensive repercussions, such as mold detection and air quality monitoring.

Thanks to early travel opportunities which exposed him to both the developed and developing world, one of Eric’s top priorities is the sustainability and longevity of buildings. His motto? It’s more efficient to build it right the first time. And every ounce of waste results in architectural disintegrity.

Eric is a regular speaker about the future of the construction industry, IoT, AI, smart buildings, and smart cities.

Read on to hear Eric’s take on overcoming the silos confronting the construction industry — and that one time he got busted for selling tacos underage.

[Editor’s note: this interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity]

Tell us about what projects you’re currently working on.

I’m working on extending the platform of hardware technologies, including IoT devices. We’re adding more sensors in buildings to get more data. IoT allows us to have data that was 100 times more expensive ten years ago. It allows a broad set of device manufacturers to solve very specific problems at a low cost–everything from mundane to highly sophisticated issues.

The solution can be something as simple as detecting a leak inside of a wall before it collapses. With IoT, once I’ve detected the leak, I can depressurize the water system through an automated valve. We can use thermometers and automated water valves to remove contagens and pathogens from drinking water supplies or use the sensors for indoor air quality monitoring. It’s able to detect mold in the wall cavity. All simple fixes that, at the end of the day, allow people to be more proactive and live in a healthier environment.

How long have you been part of this industry?

I’ve been in the AEC space for almost 25 years. I received an undergrad in architecture and immediately joined the carpenters union. I’ve been in every stage of construction, from swinging a hammer, to national building information model director, to founder and inventor of Site 1001.


What changes have you seen for the positive?

The industry has been criticized for how it’s lacked productive improvement over the past 100 years. People are quick to blame a lack of technology for lack of productivity. I disagree with that. Since I came into the marketplace with a post-grad degree, there has been a huge application of technology in the construction industry. The real problem in buildings is the archaic communication structure under which we build buildings.

We have a historical methodology that creates an adversarial relationship between contractor and owner, between change orders and cost reduction.

What I’ve seen is the application of BIM allows for collaboration between these parties that has never been possible before. BIM allows us to engage people who can’t read these details to see it, understand it, and discuss it. We’re freed up to make more sophisticated design decisions as a result. It allows visual communication. It’s going to change expectations–the days of 30 percent waste and massive change orders are over. Owners are no longer going to accept that.

What changes have you seen for the negative?

Not that we have control over it, but we have a much greater lack of skilled labor than we did before.

When I joined the union, I was surrounded by skilled tradesman. Today, because the unions aren’t able to provide that skilled labor, general contractors have become construction managers. Of course, there were specialized trades, but the general carpentry, the labor, the site conditions, safety, iron working, and masonry were all handled by a single entity–a brotherhood of skilled labor. If we were up against the schedule, and one of the trades wasn’t getting it done, I had dozens of tradesmen on the job to rally around and get the job done because it was in everyone’s best interest.

The market in construction and design is becoming more siloed because we don’t have access to skilled labor. Specialization is starting to push us back towards the problem in communication we had pre-BIM.

 

What draws you to the technology side of things?

My goal in this is to get us back on track to get rid of this abusive triad relationship. What suffers is the architecture, the built environment we deliver. People deserve good architecture.

As a student who’s traveled all over the world, I’ve seen how different cultures and governments place emphasis on good architecture. Here in the States, architecture is driven by capitalism. If you’re building a warehouse for shoes, you’re building the squarest, non-air-conditioning-est building you can build. We compound that issue when we have poor communication. We don’t allow good design to occur.

I want to see more farsighted design than the two-year construction process. It takes two years for buildings to go from hole in the mud to having the keys handed to the owner. Every ounce of waste results in architectural disintegrity.

 

Imagine you’re talking to a high school senior. What would you tell her to major in, and why?

The first bit of advice I would give is: you don’t have to decide today. The longer we have to decide what it is we want to do, compared to the amount of information we receive in that time, is the connection of how we finally get there. I’m fortunate–I don’t work. I do what I love. If you want to achieve that, you’re not going to already know what that is as an 18-year-old. Stay in a general studies program for the first couple years. Don’t close your mind.

 

What advice would you give to someone starting out in the industry?

Travel while you’re young. Travel gives you the widest breadth of experience because everything is done a little differently all over the place. We all learned to pour concrete from the Romans. Get as much project experience as you can. Be willing to move around the country and keep your eyes and ears open.

 

Was there a specific trip that impacted you?

Shock therapy. In college, I had an open year so I decided to take a job in Paris which allowed me to travel Europe on a Euro Pass. I was traveling all over, sketching buildings from the Trevi fountain to canals in Amsterdam and everything in between. I was seeing some of the world’s greatest architecture.

When I flew back stateside. I had a month to kill before classes started. My stepdad was involved in a church program going to Haiti for 14 days. So I flew from Europe to the U.S. to the poorest country in the western hemisphere. There were so few resources that if I had a Bobcat Skid-steer down here, I could have changed the country.

That was the opportunity that drove me to care about society’s impact on architecture, the desire to want what we build to provide residual value. It’s the responsibility of architects to not cut corners and sacrifice quality in order to deliver something in the short term.

What was your first job ever?

I lied about my age so I could make tacos at a fast food restaurant. It only took a month for them to catch me and fire me–I was 11 and you had to be 14.

 

Tech Takes

What is your must-have smartphone app?

I only use eight pages on the entire internet. I’ve been a full iOS ecosystems user for the last 10 years since the iPhone first came out. But I’ve realized that all of this fear and dependency I had on my Apple ecosystems was not true at all. The whole Android OS is my new favorite app. I didn’t have the courage on my own to transition, but now I am a changed person.

 

What are your favorite technology tools you use throughout your day?

Nest cameras are ultra sweet. I carry a Flir infrared camera on my body all the time to go into spaces and look at air infiltration as well as electrical–you can see shorted wires glow in infrared. You can look at a wall panel and see what’s loaded based on what color they are. It fits in a shirt pocket.

 

If you could wave a magic wand and create a new technology, what would it be?

Instant travel. As a guy who flies all the time, I need instant travel.

What is BuiltTech? Why now?

K.P. explains BuiltTech and strategies to take advantage of the opportunity.

K.P. Reddy is a serial entrepreneur with over 25 years of experience in disruptive innovation. Built environment technology, also Known as BuiltTech, is the innovation through technology that provides the framework for the physical world around us. BuiltTech is what shapes the future of planning, design, construction, and management of buildings, infrastructure, and cities.

 

Thornton Tomasetti President Asks, “Innovation: Theatre or Action?”

This post is written by Ray Daddazio, President of Thornton Tomasetti, from his notes that he took down during a lecture in January of this year. The event was sponsored jointly by Columbia University’s Business School in conjunction with Columbia Entrepreneurship, and was hosted by Chris McGarry, Director for Entrepreneurship in the University Office of Alumni and Development. Rita McGrath, a professor of management at the Business School known for her work on strategy, innovation and entrepreneurship, moderated the discussion. She is also teaching an online course called  “Mastering Corporate Entrepreneurship.” On the panel were Steve Blank, a Senior Fellow for Entrepreneurship at Columbia and serial entrepreneur and Brian Murray, President & CEO of HarperCollins Publishers.

Thornton Tomasetti Project - McCormick Place

Innovation: Theatre or Action?

The motivation of the lecture is focused on the fact that corporate entrepreneurship is a very hot topic these days. However, despite all the talk, actual innovation performance comes nowhere near to delivering on its promise. We are perhaps five years into the latest flurry of excitement about the prospects for innovation-fueled growth. Companies have traveled to Silicon Valley in droves, sponsored innovation boot camps, trained innovation ninjas, and otherwise promised their stakeholders that innovation is front and center on their agendas.

And yet, evidence suggests much of this activity is just ‘Innovation Theater.’ Indeed, how many corporations focus their cultures around an innovation playbook, and train all staff in innovation practices? In a recent McKinsey study, approximately 65% of executives surveyed reported that they were unhappy with their organization’s inability to innovate. That said, McKinsey also discovered that, “On the contrary, senior executives almost unanimously—94 percent—say that people and corporate culture are the most important drivers of innovation.”

What’s Next for Corporate Innovation?

Similar research shows that corporations are spending a lot more of their profits on things like share buybacks and dividends than they are on innovation. So, what’s next for corporate innovation? The speakers identified five major categories of executive movement:

  • Large corporations are world-class executions engines, and they now need to move at the speed of a start-up and don’t have the talent to do so. For example, Macy’s/Sears versus Amazon.
  • McKinsey’s three horizons of innovation:
    1. Incremental innovation around core business – 60%-70% of resources
    2. Adjacent business (extend and tweak portfolio) – 15%-20%
    3. Transformational (disruptive: Kindle, iPhone, long term bets) 10%-25%
  • Most CEOs come from the first horizon:
    • Leaders align budgets, promotions, other incentives for execution not innovation
    • Going from idea to good idea to acceleration of good idea is difficult
  • Providing an incentive for innovation:
    • Finance and HR are usually out of sync
    • We cannot shoot the core business, because it pays the bills
    • Balance (between sustaining core vs. disruptive innovation) is tricky and difficult to achieve
    • Need a “re-factoring group” or process that sits between innovation and execution to help work proceed seamlessly understanding limitation of each side.
  • Executives must know the difference between “innovation” and “entrepreneurship”:
    • Anyone can be innovative; the CEO just needs to get rid of the obstacles
    • McKinsey’s Horizons 1 and 2 just need innovation and continuous improvement
    • The CEO sets and ingrains a culture of quality as a mindset of the organization

Best Chance for Success at Thornton Tomasetti

The information shared in this excellent lecture reaffirms Thornton Tomasetti’s approach. These are the driving issues that lead to success or failure of most corporate innovation attempts. Setting up the TTWiiN incubator and hiring The Combine addresses the main issues identified by panel.  And, this model offers us the very best chance for success.

 

Atlanta is shaping the future of BuiltTech

BuiltTech.co is proud to announce the BuiltTech Track at Supernova South.

Join us during BuiltTech Week for lively panel discussions on topics within the built environment. The panelists include a mix of startup founders, corporate executives, built environment experts and more.

Topics Include:

When: Wed, Oct 3 – Thursday, Oct 5

Where: Peachtree Center, 285 Peachtree Center NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

Use “SNSIsrael50” for 50% off your Supernova South Ticker

Register Now

 

Bridgit brings digital transformation to construction sites

The construction site is rapidly transforming through the adoption of digital tools. Innovators are developing technology to help stakeholders deal with tasks in an effective and efficient way. Startup Bridgit is right at the heart of that effort.

 

Smaller Projects Lead Use of BIM Collaboration Platform

A new web-based, structural-engineering BIM collaboration platform is providing its devel­opers with a few surprises about how the product is being used, with more small projects loaded than expected.

The Combine, an Atlanta-based software firm, developed Konstru in partnership with engineering firm Thornton Tomasetti’s technology incubator TTWiiN, which supplied the industry expertise. After a beta launch this spring, Combine co-founder and partner K.P. Reddy .. read more..

 

A Sydney construction tech startup just raised $3 million to fund its US expansion

Sydney construction software startup Assignar has secured $3 million of capital in a series A round.

Venture capital firm Our Innovation Fund (OIF), also based in Sydney, led the round that will help Assignar boost local sales then expand its presence in the US market, where it already has a small client list

The Post A Sydney construction tech startup just raised $3 million to fund its US expansion appeared first on Business Insider Australia.

Source: www.businessinsider.com.au

 

‘Smart Money’: VC Firm Our Innovation Fund Backs Two Tech Sartups To The Tune Of $5M

“Due to the growth of cloud and mobile technology as options in the field, the construction sector is ripe for disruption,” McCreanor told Dynamic …

The post ‘SMART MONEY’: VC FIRM OUR INNOVATION FUND BACKS TWO TECH STARTUPS TO THE TUNE OF $5M appeared first on Dynamic Business .

Source: www.dynamicbusiness.com.au

 

 

Autodesk Makes Investment in Boston-based Smartvid.io—Machine Learning Tech Startup in Construction Industry

Autodesk makes a strategic investment in Boston-based Smartvid.io—a machine learning based startup that makes intelligent use of industrial photography and videos in the construction industry.

The post Autodesk Makes Investment in Boston-based Smartvid.io—Machine Learning Tech Startup in Construction Industry appeared first on architosh.com.

Source: www.architosh.com

 

Construction Tech Startup Aproplan Secures $5.7M In Funding +11 VR Startups Tackling Enterprise +Why Construction’s Role In Smart Cities Is Key +More

 

Today’s Daily is sponsored by  Construction tech startup Aproplan secures $5.7M in funding  | @constructdive The company, which has dubbed itself the “Salesforce for construction,” will use the capital to produce new features for its app that streamlines construction workers’ communication and document-sharing capabilities on the job site to cut down on project schedules and stay under …

The post Construction Tech Startup Aproplan Secures $5.7M In Funding +11 VR Startups Tackling Enterprise +Why Construction’s Role In Smart Cities Is Key +More appeared first on BUILTR.IO.

Source: BUILTR