DISRUPTING THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT WITH TECHNOLOGY

Look to the Past for a Better Future

November 24, 2017

The AEC workflow looks nothing like it did thirty years ago.

From paper and pencil to CAD and now BIM, Cliff Moser is a prime example of how to adapt and evolve in an industry that isn’t always receptive to change.

head shot of Cliff MoserBased in Oakland, California, Cliff is an architect currently using BIM to facilitate the design and construction of 500P, the new Stanford University Hospital for Stanford Healthcare. This $2B project for an 824,000-square-foot facility features advanced diagnostic, therapeutic and surgical technologies, and will provide an additional 368 beds, as well as a new Emergency Department with twice the floor space of the current facility.

A leading voice in Design Solving methodology, Moser is the author of Architecture 3.0: The Disruptive Design Practice Handbook; outlining innovation and disruption in the practice of architecture. His other works include BIM Disruption 2016: The Disruption of Interoperability and the AIA Architect’s Handbook of Professional Practice (14th and 15th editions), where he authored the chapters on Quality Management.

He also authors a bi-monthly column for Constructech Magazine on the travails of the owner requirements for design and construction deliverables.

How long have you been part of this industry?

Cliff Moser: Over thirty-five years. I studied architecture, and also got a Master’s in quality assurance. That combination has made me very focused on using the lean approach and Toyota method on the job. My motto has become quality has to be embedded during the entire process, not just checked at the end.

What changes have you seen in the industry since you started out?

Cliff Moser: The apprentice/mentor model has disappeared, and we have no good replacement for oversight. We’ve lost that opportunity for managers to be engaged with what new hires were drawing and how they were drawing it. When I first started, you’d be drawing on a desk and leave your drawings out overnight when you went home. That gave the managing principles a chance to look at your stuff at the end of the day or in the morning, leave notes on it, and work through it with you the next day, guiding you.

Now, with everyone’s models locked into a computer, we’ve lost the opportunity for that feedback loop. The people who model and draw work in isolation until it’s time to hand the designs off. That means instead of catching mistakes internally under mentor review, firms transfer those mistakes to the customer. The customer becomes QA, rejecting what they receive, changing the schedule, adding additional costs, even pursuing lawsuits. We need a better way.

Why do you think this industry lags behind in tech?

Cliff Moser: Without the mentor/apprentice model, everyone learns by doing. So we have to do things wrong 3, 4, 5, 6 times. Some believe there’s no better way than the old way. I’ve seen 24-year-olds say there’s no better way than the old way. That to me signals a complete process breakdown: they’re frustrated with trying to improve things, so they give up. But in Kanban I learned the issue is never the person; it’s the process. The problem is never the tool; it’s the culture. Unfortunately, the way we’ve always done things is: if you have a new idea, we’ll wait you out and make you miserable until you come back to our way of doing things.

What advice would you give to someone just starting out in AEC?

Cliff Moser: Study the classics. Read old books, watch old movies. Travel. I’ve noticed with this current generation, there’s a sense of non-understanding or non-awareness of the past. 20-29-year-olds: When they discover Andy Griffith on TV they wonder, “what the heck is this?” But if you’re supposed to be building something that lasts for 30, 60 years, connected to a world that started before cars and will continue way after, it’s important for people to see how things were back in those days.

Go out and build. One of the ways I really learned how to do things was by gardening – building garden sheds and systems like that. That gives you an opportunity to learn how to nail things together and learn how when you draw something it doesn’t really work that way in reality.

What was your first job ever?

Cliff Moser: Newspaper boy – that’s how I got my early morning chops in! By waking up 4 am to deliver newspapers at nine years old. In my house, you had to toe the line for an allowance so I earned my own cash.

5 Tech Takes

What is your must-have smartphone app?

Cliff Moser: Feedly – I use that all the time. It’s like browsing the library. If you only go after your own interests you never see anything new.

What are your 3 favorite technology tools you use throughout your day?

Cliff Moser: Smart phone camera for photographing and sharing everything on the job-site, especially as-built conditions. Bluebeam for grabbing information from files and turning photos PDFs. Google Maps.

If you could wave a magic wand and create a new technology, what would it be?

Cliff Moser: Self-updating models. Walk into a room with a tablet or phone, and the model updates itself based on IoT sensors and photogrammetry. However, now, I’m going to be taking a Revit model that we paid millions for, hand it over to a facilities team who has to find someone who knows Revit, in order to see what’s in there. All that knowledge trapped in one person and one platform just doesn’t make sense.

Windows/MAC/Linux?

Cliff Moser: Windows — it’s the most written-to platform.

iOS or Android?

Cliff Moser: I tend to go with iOS – I have nothing but iPhones that companies have given me. Plus, Instagram on iPhone changed my wife’s life by helping her run a small business.

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Stop, Collaborate, and Listen

November 24, 2017

For Brian Skripac, the key to implementing new technology is to try not to get bogged down in the technology.

Counterintuitive, right?

But for him, tech is less about the “what,” and more about the, “how.”

He asks, “How do we plan our work and work the plan?”

In other words, it doesn’t matter so much what a tool can do unless you know how to use it. And knowing how to use it requires a thoughtful approach to teams and processes. It’s about being focused on operational excellence.

head shot image of Brian Skripac

Brian Skripac is currently a Vice President and the Director of Virtual Design and Construction at CannonDesign, where he continually drives innovation by merging technology and practice. He has 21 years of industry experience, with the last 11 focusing on the integration of BIM to transform the design and project delivery process.

Brian Skripachas also successfully developed and managed BIM-enabled delivery systems for large efforts in Design-Led Construction. In addition, he focuses on the use of BIM to capture and structure relevant facility data, implementing the value BIM brings to facility owners from an interoperable lifecycle management strategy. A thought-leader in this field, he is an advisory group member and past-chair of the AIA National Technology in Architectural Practice Knowledge Community and serves on the BIMForum committee responsible for authoring the LOD Specification.

How long have you been part of this industry?

Brian Skripac: I’ve been part of AEC industry since 1996, and then I really started with a BIM focus back in 2005. I was working as a post-graduate architect looking to get into a project architect role, and I was teaching a college-level 3D modeling class in the evening and on the weekends. Someone mentioned an opportunity to work with an Autodesk reseller consulting firm, and it was there that I came across Revit for the first time. I thought to myself, “This is a game changer.” In that moment I saw that it wasn’t just about using a new software. It’s about driving a whole new process about how we practice architecture.

What changes have you seen for the positive in the AEC space since then?

Brian Skripac: A better focus on collaboration and integration. The more we work with these new technologies, the more we start to embrace processes where we work more collaboratively. We’re doing a better job of breaking down the silos of architect and builder. We’re able to take advantage of information and knowledge on the construction side to come back to the design side and raise the bar on how we deliver projects.

This BIM wave we’re on is certainly something that’s facilitated that. More owners have adopted this model, which gives you better deliverables, reduced cost, improved schedule. It used to be you could get two out of three: cost, time, and quality. Now we do a better job of planning out our work and sharing knowledge and information.

A tool like BIM can be a catalyst but it’s not the easy button. It gives you the ability to know and plan for what you want to capture, but you need great teams and processes to take advantage of it.

What changes have you seen for the negative?

Brian Skripac: With BIM, the constraints of sharing information is a concern. But that’s also an opportunity. It’s not about risk avoidance, but risk management. In the industry, at a project manager level, there’s still trepidation to share what we’re doing. That’s the difference between the people who are excelling and the people you aren’t: the ones who are sharing, collaborating, are excelling. At CannonDesign, we’re embracing this Virtual Design and Construction idea, and we have a design-led construction team. Part of our delivery model is the larger idea of being a single source environment. When we can do it, we’re much more collaborative and the sharing of information goes further to building repeatable, collaborative engagements.

What draws you to the technology side of things?

Brian Skripac: For me, when I first came out of school, I had to do the same mundane things over and over; repeat the same change ten times across a set of drawings. Initially, I was attracted to the technology, but when I got to really learn the tool, I quickly saw beyond the visualization aspects and realized it’s about a larger project performance idea. As an architect, I’ve always been intrigued by the construction side, and having project opportunities to work with owners on how to set delivery standards as it relates to BIM has been a full circle endeavor.

Why do you think this industry lags behind in tech?

Brian Skripac: I’ve seen this problem from multiple sides. Sometimes in architecture, it lags because a majority of architecture firms are ten people or less. There’s a financial constraint of switching over systems, and a human capital constraint of who’s going to lead that. With large firms, it’s like turning a cruise ship, so pushing standards and process changes have its own unique time constraints to get a full adoption.

Imagine you’re talking to a high school senior. What would you tell her to major in, and why?

Brian Skripac: Whatever they’re interested in. Find something that you like doing and go all in. My kids explore different things and I want them to be savvy and creative at the same time. A lot of their activities in school are very tech-focused and I just want them to keep learning. My son had a class this year where they were using modeling systems and 3D printers and my daughter just attended a summer camp called Camp Invention, which had a STEM focus. There are so many opportunities to innovate.

What advice would you give to someone starting out in the industry?

Brian Skripac: Don’t be bogged down by, “that’s how we’ve always done it.” Find new ways. That’s the biggest killer: “that’s not how we do it”, or “we’ve always done it this way.” No. We’ve got to evolve.

What’s the worst advice you’ve ever gotten?

Brian Skripac: At a previous firm, we were doing testing and vetting new sustainability tools. We were looking at analysis software, trying to figure out how to integrate it into our design process. My CEO at that time was in our presentation. He stood up and told us, “You guys are just wasting your bonus checks spending your time on this. We’re not going to waste money on this and you’re just wasting your time.” Needless to say, I started working on my resume and left that firm shortly after that.

What was your first job ever?

Brian Skripac: I cut grass when I was 10 or 12, around the neighborhood and the front yard of my dad’s office on weekends.

Tech Takes

What is your must-have smartphone app?

Brian Skripac: Cozi. That is our family calendar app. Everything’s color-coded, so you know who’s going where at what time: who’s traveling for work, who’s got baseball after school. It’s a sanity check.

What are your 3 favorite technology tools you use throughout your day?

Brian Skripac: I love Twitter for staying up to date and sharing and gathering information. Trello is a great one, using cards to manage to-do lists, get feedback on ideas, and communicate with our team. We also use join.me for communications. I spend a lot time on the phone with our offices around the globe, so being able to connect with people that way is pretty important.

Windows/MAC/Linux and why?

Brian Skripac: For whatever reason, I’ve never been in a working environment besides Windows.

iOS or Android, and why?

Brian Skripac: I love my iPhone!

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6 Paths To Automated Construction Site +Why Geometry Is More Important To Offsite Construction Than Data + Tech Will Help Close Performance Gap +More

November 18, 2017

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Today’s Daily is sponsored by  6 Paths to the Automated Construction Site  | @asmedotorg While automation has transformed the world of manufacturing, construction remains relatively untouched by self-sufficient machines. That is about to change. Artificial intelligence, 3D printing, and robotics are poised to bring automation to building construction. Why geometry is more important to offsite …

The post 6 Paths To Automated Construction Site +Why Geometry Is More Important To Offsite Construction Than Data + Tech Will Help Close Performance Gap +More appeared first on BUILTR.IO.

Source: BUILTR

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